Terminological research

In this section, our research team offers insights on specific financial topics with a focus on terminological clarification and standardisation. The objective is to actually overcome difficulties by suggesting practical linguistic solutions.

How to translate the multifaceted term “insurance claim”?

How to translate the multifaceted term “insurance claim”?

Native speakers might find this question trivial, but they should be aware that this term has many different meanings. For non-natives, let us start with the basics: in general terms, a claim can be a simple statement, a right over something or a demand for something that is owed.

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ARGOS FinNeo and CORUM Asset Management's glossary on French SCPIs

ARGOS FinNeo and CORUM Asset Management's glossary on French SCPIs

This glossary on French “SCPI” real estate investment companies (Sociétés Civiles de Placement Immobilier) is intended to help foreign investors understand the jargon surrounding these investment vehicles governed by the French Civil Code and similar to Anglo-Saxon "Real Estate Investment Funds" (REITs).

Read more: ARGOS FinNeo and CORUM Asset Management's glossary on French SCPIs

Why do we say “invertir” instead of “investir” in Spanish?

Why do we say “invertir” instead of “investir” in Spanish?
History of the financial term “to invest”

This term comes from medieval latin investire, composed of in which means anything like “in”, “inside” or “into” and vestire, that is “to clothe”, which has remained vestire in Italian and became vestir in Spanish and vêtir in French (a synonym of habiller).

The term investire was first used in Italian in the military sense “to besiege” or “to surround an ennemy” and was passed on to English and French. From late 16th / early 17th century, investir started to be used in French as “to endow with an authority” or “to assign someone a duty” and was quickly passed on to English (1640s) and to other languages. This sense has remained until now and can be heard in English in expressions such as “to be invested as president”, in French in investiture or in Spanish in investidura.

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Financial language is not always boring… it can be picturesque!

Financial language is not always boring… it can be picturesque!

If you are a golden boy, you will certainly notice that in the business press blue chip companies often hold cash cows in their portfolios, that is, products or assets that generate above-the-average cash flows over long periods. Innovators hope their products will become leading high‑growth stars or rising stars in a dynamic market. On the contrary, they try to stay away from failed projects or dogs that need to be sold off as quickly as possible.

Read more: Financial language is not always boring… it can be picturesque!